How to Teach the P Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /p/ sound is a bilabial sound, meaning that it involves both lips being pressed together to create. Air is then released through the lips and slightly open teeth, creating the /p/ sound. Unlike the /b/ sound, which is made with the same mouth position, the /p/ sound is an unvoiced sound. The sound you hear comes from the pressure …

How to Teach the M Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /m/ sound is a nasal sound, which means that all passage through the mouth is blocked and air instead has to travel through the nose. It is also a voiced (vs. unvoiced) sound, which requires the vibration of vocal cords. Closing your mouth and lips and using your voice to make a sound creates the /m/ sound. The lips are important for …

How to Teach the H Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /h/ sound is one of the easier sounds to articulate. It does not involve any special arrangement of the lips or tongue or complicated movements. In order to produce the sound, simply open your mouth and breathe. The sound is unvoiced, which means that what you hear comes from the movement of the air through your throat and mouth. Since the sound …

How to Teach the N Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

Like the /m/ sound, the /n/ sound is a voiced, nasal sound. This means that the sound is created by the speaker vibrating their vocal cords while pushing air through their nose, or nasal cavity. The /n/ sound is distinguished from the /m/ sound by the placement of the speaker’s tongue. To make the /n/ sound, place the tip of your tongue just …

How to Teach the W Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /w/ sound is considered a glide or a semivowel sound by speech-language pathologists. In other words, /w/ sounds a lot like a vowel and sometimes even acts like one, even though it is technically a consonant. To make a /w/ sound, form a tight circle with puckered lips brought out and away from your face. With your lips in this position, produce …

How to Teach the B Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /b/ sound is a bilabial sounds, which means the lips are pressed together while producing the sound. It is also a voiced sound, which means that the vocal cords are vibrating when the breath is released from the lips. This is different than the unvoiced /p/ sound, for example, which gets its sound simply from the release of air. …

How to Teach the K Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /k/ sound is very similar to the /g/ sound because they both use the same mouth position. Both are stop consonants, which means the airflow while producing the sound is first stopped, and then released. /K/ is different because it is an unvoiced sound – the only sound you hear when making it is the sound the air makes when you release …

How to Teach the G Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /g/ sound and the /k/ sound are very similar and use the same mouth position. So what makes them different? The /g/ sound is a voiced sound and the /k/ sound is unvoiced. That means that your vocal cords are vibrating as air is passed through the mouth to make the /g/ sound. Position the back of your tongue at …